Union Transfer

1026 SPRING GARDEN STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19123 Ι 215-232-2100

The Sounds Performing 'Dying To Say This To You'

To Celebrate 10 Years ...

The Sounds Performing 'Dying To Say This To You'

Zipper Club, My Jerusalem

Fri, November 25, 2016

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:30 pm

Union Transfer

Philadelphia, PA

$25

This event is all ages

The Sounds
The Sounds
Like its namesake, it’s easy to look forward to WEEKEND, the new album by Swedish indie rockers THE SOUNDS (Label:Arnioki Records/INgrooves; Release date: October 29, 2013). Sporting an urgency like that of a band fresh out of the womb, Weekend is the sound of a band rejuvenated and reborn. For The Sounds, they have been reborn in a sense… back to when they first started. “Weekend is more of a back to basics album,” says Jesper Anderberg (keyboards/guitar). “I was primarily looking for a groove when I started writing this album – a groove based on five members who have been playing music together for a long time. We weren’t looking to overthink the song writing, and especially wanted to make it sound like we just hit the switch on the amps and just started playing the songs.” To celebrate the release of Weekend, the band will be playing a handful of North American dates including stops in Brooklyn, Canada, Chicago and the West Coast, followed by a full European headline tour.

From the punky dance rock signature sound of the opening tracks “Shake Shake Shake” and “Take It The Wrong Way” that recalls the shuffling exuberance of their groundbreaking debut to the winsome and shimmery “Hurt the Ones I Love” to the 60s style rock of “Emperor”, Weekend takes their trademark danceable indie rock “sound” and expands in different directions. This musical journey is most noticeable in the chill-down title track “Weekend” and the cleverly disguised dance infused “Great Day”, which both start acoustically yet build and evolve to a frenzy of passion and instrumentation.

The Sounds collected and leaned upon all of the lessons they’ve learned from touring the world headlining clubs and festivals, owning a studio and self producing their last album Something To Die For when writing and recording this album. These experiences propel them forward on Weekend thanks in part to the production work of Alex Newport (Bloc Party, Death Cab for Cutie, City and Colour, Frank Turner, At The Drive-In, The Mars Volta) who moved with the band into the legendary Svenska Grammafon Studion far away from the bands hometown, and tied it all together capturing the magic in the studio that has delighted and captivated fans for a decade on the road. “While recording, we all lived in the SGS studios together with Alex, and we were all using the same kitchen and bathroom and so on,” says drummer Fredrik Blond. “That creates a certain vibe I think. And it forces you to deal with things, not just run away from them.” Adds Jesper, “It’s important to be able to try new approaches, and we’ve never been afraid of trying new paths in our songwriting. I think it’s important for bands to be able to change their sound and explore new ways. I believe we have great fans that understand the process of music making, that not every album will or can sound the same. Our fans are also the ones that give us exactly that privilege….to write and record the songs we want, the way we want them to sound…and for that we are very grateful.”

Formed in 1998 in Sweden, The Sounds exploded on the alt-rock scene with their wildly lauded 2002 debut Living in America and its breakthrough singles “Seven Days a Week”, “Rock’n Roll”, and the aptly named title track. Fronted by the striking Maja Ivarsson, The Sounds have continued to remain on the forefront of the music scene, releasing a handful of albums, each spawning single after single like “Tony the Beat”, “Painted By Numbers”, “Song With A Mission”, “No One Sleeps When I’m Awake”, “Beatbox”, “Something to Die For” and “Dance with the Devil”. “I think it’s a mutual love to music and to our fans,” explains Jesper about how they’ve been able to remain for over a decade and a half and maintain the same line-up and uphold their creative spark. “The key is to respect each other. It’s a weird thing to be together for that long. You might have disagreements but that’s the way it is sometimes, but if you can’t solve an argument, you shouldn’t start a band. But for us, it has always been us and it will only be the five of us.”
Zipper Club
Zipper Club
Zipper Club is comprised of Mason James of Cerebral Ballzy and Lissy Trullie of Lissy Trullie. “I was never pigeonholed into liking one specific genre,” says Mason, the no-nonsense guitarist and founding member behind the addictive assault of a new-wave inspired band alongside multi-instrumentalist, co-writer, and vocalist Lissy Trullie. “If it sounds good I don’t care if it’s from the 1920s or the 2016s. As a musician, you take little tidbits of cool sounds you hear and combine them into something completely unique. it needs to reflect on itself.” Such a lack of musical inhibition goes a long way in explaining how Mason, a raucous punk-rock kid whose life goals were once to “thrash around onstage and get wildly drunk” with his previous band, Cerebral Ballzy, and Trullie, a successful solo artist in her own right with her eponymous indie-rock band, threw caution to the wind and concocted pop music unlike any they’ve made before. “I really respect and love well-written hooks. That’s always something that gets me excited,” Trullie says. “It’s a huge change and not a logical one,” Mason says with a laugh of Zipper Club’s pop missiles, which he began penning two years ago. “It’s a super 180 for me. But that’s what I think is really cool about it. It made me realize that the music is the only thing that matters.”

Zipper Club is at its core a union of like-minded musicians who share a musical story and, through their respective former bands, have each navigated the rocky waters of the music industry. The result is a blissful head rush of a band now coming to the fore, armed with buzzing guitars, spacey synths and magnetic melodies via its debut single, “Going The Distance.” “It’s music that’s not trying to be something it’s not,” Trullie says of the band’s addictive, brain-lodging sound on its forthcoming debut album, produced by James Iha (Smashing Pumpkins, A Perfect Circle). Adds Mason: “It’s synth-bred, weird-sounding music that’s different but still melodic and palatable.”
My Jerusalem
My Jerusalem
Near the icy waters and snow-covered shores of Brighton Beach in Brooklyn, New York, Jeff Klein locked himself in a rental house and did nothing but write for a month. A few blocks away, in the Midwood area, sits the home in which his mother grew up. A prolonged illness had claimed her life a few years earlier.

“That was me coming to terms with the whole situation,” the My Jerusalem frontman explains of his attempt to embed himself within his family history after many years of being on the road, touring. “I kept walking by this house my grandparents used to live in on Avenue H. I’ve never been very connected to family. I’ve romanticized the idea of family, but I think I was just trying to connect with something.”

Klein, who normally resides in Austin, felt an immediate inspiration there and was prolific during these winter weeks near his mother’s childhood neighborhood, producing 14 songs, 12 of which would come to be the band’s forthcoming album, A Little Death.

“The little death,” or “la petite mort” in French, refers to, well, an orgasm, and somewhere between the literal definition and the slang is where Klein situated the album. “Like any kid, I was obsessed with death and obsessed with sex. Some people grow out of it and start families and become normal people and some of us just stay the same,” he laughs. “I’m still obsessing about the psychology behind death and sex.”

This duality bleeds through on the album, which flexes a lurid sexual energy, reminiscent of something between Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds and Echo and the Bunnymen. Though My Jerusalem has been kicking around in some capacity since 2010, A Little Death is the first album with a solidified lineup. Previously, the band had been more of a collective, with contributions from Klein’s revolving door of friends from previous projects, Gutter Twins and The Twilight Singers, and who had also played in bands like Cursive, Okkervil River, and the Polyphonic Spree. Now, with a full-time lineup of members including Grant Van Amburgh (drums), Kyle Robarge (bass), and Jon Merz (guitar, keys, horns), My Jerusalem is a true band, Klein says.

Alongside standout tracks like the high-energy “Rabbit Rabbit” and the slowed down banger “No One Gonna Give You Love,” Klein also enlisted the help of another friend on A Little Death’s opener, “Young Leather,” singer Elle King, who contributes background vocals under the song’s raging saxophone. The two have history back to when King was younger and used to work at the tattoo shop where Klein’s friends would hang out. Her timeless voice is the perfect complement to the old-fashioned nature of A Little Death, an album which pays homage to a classic era of rock and roll, one that lacked pretension and focused on honesty in songwriting.

“The album has a throwback vibe to it,” says Klein, who spent many nights walking around the time capsule of an area around his rental home, among the Russian immigrants and foreign culture of the New York blocks. “I feel like you can hear Brooklyn in the 50s and 60s in that record, or maybe it’s my delusional mind.”

Ultimately, through A Little Death, Klein was finally able to reflect on the family and personal issues he’d put on the backburner for years. “There’s a recurring theme of fate, luck, desire, and consequence,” he says of it, “and also, how to be more accountable as a human.”
Venue Information:
Union Transfer
1026 Spring Garden St.
Philadelphia, PA, 19123