Union Transfer

1026 SPRING GARDEN STREET, PHILADELPHIA, PA 19123 Ι 215-232-2100

La Dispute & Title Fight

La Dispute & Title Fight

The Hotelier

Thu, March 26, 2015

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

Union Transfer

Philadelphia, PA

$20.50 - $23.00

Sold Out

This event is all ages

La Dispute
La Dispute
Not many people make art for the sake of art anymore. In an age of dwindling attention spans and pop songs based on samples of what came before them, we need bands like La Dispute more than ever—and their third full-length Rooms Of The House is evidence of why.

The band—which features vocalist Jordan Dreyer, guitarists Kevin Whittemore and Chad Morgan-Sterenberg, bassist Adam Vass and drummer Brad Vander Lugt—began work on Rooms Of The House last April by renting a cabin in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. “The area where we were was pretty remote so we could focus on playing and not much else,” Vass explains. “It was just the five of us working on writing every single day for a month and pretty much the entire album came out of those sessions.” Following that the band headlined Australia and spent the next few months perfecting this collection of songs before heading into Pennsylvania’s Studio 4 Recording with record producer and engineer Will Yip. “We decided pretty early on that we wanted to work with Will because we’re a band that’s very deliberate in what we want from our records sonically and he has a special sense for visualizing and facilitating that,” Dreyer articulates.

Musically, Rooms Of The House—which is also the first release on Better Living, a label recently started by the band—has more hallmarks of a pop album than the band’s previous work but also manages to retain La Dispute’s signature sound. “The challenge with this record became trying to do more with less so I think from a musical and lyrical standpoint that’s something that will stand out to listeners,” he goes on.
In that spirit Rooms Of The House sees Dreyer stepping back to focus on the everyday interactions that make up our daily lives, using a collapsing relationship as the backdrop for the way household objects continue to hold meaning long after both parties have moved on. “You have all these ordinary things in your life that develop their own history in the memories you share with another person and once you lose that person all of those things continue to remain,” he explains. “The album started out being about a fictional couple and then over time it developed into more of a sweeping narrative about common space and history and about the history of objects,” he continues. “What happens to them after things dissolve, how they end up being reappropriated into something else.”

Like all of La Dispute’s releases Rooms Of The House showcases the band’s extreme attention to detail from the sequencing to graphic designer Vass’ captivating artwork. “I like the idea of knowing the end of a story from the beginning so when we started writing in April I already had a vision of what I wanted to do with the cover art,” Vass explains. “The imagery on the cover and even the way the songs are individually laid out all tie into the album’s bigger concepts,” he continues. “The art was largely inspired by the song ‘Objects In Space’ and the idea of a group of objects coming together to have some kind of greater meaning in their curation.”

Ultimately, listening to Rooms Of The House is the best way to truly understand their vision. “I’m so proud of this record because through years of playing music together we’ve found our own musical identity that I think is a true representation of our vision,” Dreyer summarizes. “It’s so liberating to be able to share that with my bandmates and have a collective creative identity that doesn’t feel impeded by anything longing for success. It’s just a lot of fun.”
Title Fight
Title Fight
Having formed in 2003 while its members (bassist/vocalist Ned Russin, guitarist/vocalist Jamie Rhoden, guitarist Shane Moran, and drummer Ben Russin) were in middle school, the band’s juvenilia had begun in typically wobbly fashion. In 2011, Title Fight released their debut album, Shed, followed by their sophomore release Floral Green (2012). After spending almost a decade finding an approach that worked, Title Fight had voluntarily embarked on the road to finding another approach that would work — maybe even work better.

In comes Hyperview, the follow-up release to Title Fight's 2013 release the Spring Songs EP. Produced by Will Yip in Conshohocken, Pa, it is Title Fight's eagerly anticipated third full length album and their first with Anti-. Dreamy guitars weigh heavy and carry the meaning of the songs, while hazy vocals make the album feel like the soundtrack to a gorgeous dream. The listener is periodically struck by faint echoes of the familiar (the Floral Greenishly tuneful and driving “Chlorine”) and of the canonical (the incantatory pummel of My Bloody Valentine’s Isn’t Anything period, as on “New Vision”; a Scratch Acid bassline jarringly yet winningly resolving itself into a Chapterhouse swirl, as on “Hypernight”), this is an album that renders futile the exercise of conceiving bands as sums of influences, and of dutifully itemizing those influences. Hyperview can only be heard, and loved, as an artifact unto itself.
The Hotelier
The Hotelier
It is not enough to say that The Hotelier have grown older, or wiser, or more of anything. We can trace a progression, if we like, from the explosive empowerment of It Never Goes Out to the ashen disillusionment of Home, Like Noplace Is There. We can follow an awakening of youth in suburbia attempting to learn what is right, and what is ours, and what is possible and impossible, and maybe we can't save each other like we thought we once could. We're awake and we're tired and we want love in our lives again. And so we find ourselves now in Goodness, in the woods outside of the suburbs, trying to re-learn that love.

But we seek a space outside time. Once in a while we can feel it, like a clearing. Where our histories and our rhetoric blends into languages spoken and unspoken. Where the greatest awe comes upon us for the overlooked, the simple, the incomprehensible. Where things glitch as they solidify, repeat as they evolve, scream as they whisper. Where always and forever above us, in all of its natural, unnatural, supernatural love, shines the moon. Goodness is not this place -- goodness is nowhere -- but we are following it to where we have to be.

After all we've gone through, how young are we? What is age softening in us, what is it hardening in us? Are we getting better? Worse? How could we ever know, when capital forces us onward away from ourselves? Will the woods consume the suburbs; will the suburbs consume the woods? In the gaps between these monumental questions, in the tiniest details, in the infinitude of cycles outside of time, there is Goodness. We begin there.
Venue Information:
Union Transfer
1026 Spring Garden St.
Philadelphia, PA, 19123