Union Transfer


Modern Baseball

Modern Baseball

Jeff Rosenstock, Sorority Noise, Tiny Moving Parts

Sat, December 12, 2015

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

Union Transfer

Philadelphia, PA

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This event is all ages

Modern Baseball
Modern Baseball
In just a few short years, Modern Baseball have gone from college freshman self-recording their first record to a worldwide phenomenon. Somehow, it feels like just the beginning. In 2016, Modern Baseball will release their new album Holy Ghost through Run For Cover Records. The first album recorded by someone other than the band themselves, Modern Baseball enlisted Joe Reinhart (Hop Along, Joyce Manor) at Headroom Studios in Philadelphia to help refine their sound. Holy Ghost shows off the band’s sonic growth, adding in new influences ranging from The Killers to Pedro The Lion.

In a tight 28 minutes, Holy Ghost covers an impressive emotional range. Throughout the process, co-songwriters Jacob Ewald and Brendan Lukens found themselves in different places writing different songs; so they split the record in half. The record kicks off with six songs from Ewald and ends with five from Lukens. What they ended up with was a complete record of the past two years– the highs alongside the lows, tales from the road and glorious days at home alongside songs of heartbreak and personal struggle.

Modern Baseball began as a high-school acoustic duo in small town Maryland, banding together over a mutual love of Say Anything, Motion City Soundtrack and The Gaslight Anthem. After Lukens and Ewald moved to Philadelphia to each attend separate colleges, they took advantage of the recording studios at Ewald’s university to record their debut full length Sports with fellow student and future bassist Ian Farmer. The band released the album through Lame-O Records in 2012, creating a full lineup with Farmer on bass and classmate Sean Huber on drums. Sports’ unique brand of scrappy indie-punk exuded a relatable charm that pleasantly caught people by surprise. Generating a buzz online and developing strong roots within the incredibly supportive DIY Philadelphia scene, Modern Baseball grew at a remarkable speed, quickly becoming one of the most popular bands in the punk and indie rock community.

The band quickly gained the attention of Run For Cover Records, who signed the young punks in early 2013. With a goofy and sweet stage presence, Modern Baseball saw their fans multiplying as they toured across the country on school breaks. Finding a deep connection in their tremendous honesty and earnestness, people flocked to the band from all corners of the punk, pop and indie scenes. By the time they released their follow up record You’re Gonna Miss It All in 2014, Modern Baseball had built a solid foundation of buzz and deeply passionate fans. The record charted at #97 on Billboard’s Top 200 and led them to tours with bands like The Wonder Years, Into It. Over It., The Menzingers, and even their high school heroes, Say Anything, as they toured across the US, the UK and Europe.

Modern Baseball’s music matures as its members mature, evident in the darker sound and lyrical focus of their 2015 EP The Perfect Cast. Still flaunting their signature sincerity, the band turns their adolescent nervous energy into insightful emotional awareness and sonic power. In 2016, Modern Baseball will release Holy Ghost through Run For Cover Records. The highly anticipated album brings a newfound weight to the band, as they continue to grow emotionally and musically with each new release. 2016 looks to launch the band into even greater things, bringing their fans along as they become a slightly older, slightly more profound version of Modern Baseball.
Jeff Rosenstock
Jeff Rosenstock
Jeff Rosenstock was an anxious kid who grew into an anxious adult and has also made a bunch of music along the way with a bunch of bands, most notably Bomb the Music Industry! who apparently pioneered giving shit away for free on the internet - or at least got some of the credit for it.

Now he plays with his bi-coastal band of rad musicians, mixing punk heart with diverse instrumentation and occasional accuracy. The new record POST- was written in a snowy mountain dreamscape, recorded in a marathon session and finished moments before it was released on New Year's Day. Most of it (like 51%) was recorded live to tape, making the record a fiery distillation of Rosenstock's high energy live shows that push the boundaries of dynamics in rock music.

I hope. I don't know, that's what I was going for at least.

-- Jeff
Sorority Noise
Sorority Noise
“I don’t want to be in an emo band anymore,” proclaims SORORITY NOISE frontman Cameron Boucher. “But I have no problem with people calling us that, because in the strictest of senses, we are an emotionally driven band.”

That, is Sorority Noise in a nutshell: part of a movement, but also discrete and determined to break free from the pack. Truth be told, the Connecticut-based quartet—Boucher, guitarist/vocalist Adam “Scuff” Ackerman, bassist/vocalist Ryan McKenna and drummer Charlie Singer—have always operated a little differently than most of their peers.

For starters, Boucher attended the University of Hartford for jazz saxophone, while guitarist Ackerman studies acoustics and upright bass. But it’s not just their unorthodox musical chops that set the band apart in the underground punk scene. With the release of their Topshelf Records debut, JOY, DEPARTED, Sorority Noise—recently named one of the 100 Bands You Need to Know in 2015 by Alternative Press—are poised to break out in a big way.

Joy, Departed is more than just the best iteration of Sorority Noise to date; the album also marks a creative shift for Boucher, who draws musical influence from a diverse crop of acts spanning Regina Spektor and jazz trumpeter Chet Baker to The Smiths and Broken Social Scene—and previously spent time fronting screamo band Old Gray. In some ways, the singer says he approached the creative process like writing his very first album.

Boucher started Sorority Noise in late 2013 with friends as an outlet to explore musical styles outside his work in Old Gray. The group then recruited Ackerman and issued their debut full-length, Forgettable, in May 2014. Much buzz—and tours with rising stars Modern Baseball and The Hotelier—followed, as did a split 7” with Somos and the arrivals of Singer (whom Boucher had played with in Old Gray) and McKenna.

Outside of pure proficiency, one of the more gripping elements of Sorority Noise's musical direction is the band’s willingness to speak of personal hardships, including the often-taboo topic of addiction on songs like the heart-wrenching album-closer “When I See You (Timberwolf).”

"There’s so many people having drug problems—and a lot of bands who play it safe and don’t want to talk about it,” Boucher explains. “I think it’s important to be shown in modern music. I like to be honest about my past and talk about things that have had me down. As a lyricist, you are responsible for the people who care about your music.”

That’s ultimately what makes Joy, Departed such an important album: It’s life, warts and all, sung by someone who’s been through it firsthand. It’s not always rosy, but it’s real. Above all, it’s an album meant to be experienced as a body of work—not single songs plucked piecemeal or shuffled on a streaming service. And for Boucher, he hopes it will show critics and fans alike Sorority Noise has something to say, something he’s willing to say as loudly as they’ll let him.
Tiny Moving Parts
Tiny Moving Parts
Bandmates call each other "family" all the time–when you're in a van or bus touring for most of the year, fostering a close relationship is an integral part of the territory. Feuds and disagreements amongst bandmates can be career-ending for even the most promising young acts, while groups that stay tight-knit can experience longevity.

When it comes to Tiny Moving Parts, a literal family band from the tiny town of Benson, MN, there's no problem operating in close quarters. Vocalist/guitarist Dylan Mattheisen and his cousins–bassist Matthew Chevalier and drummer Billy Chevalier, who are brothers–have been best friends since their childhood. As Mattheisen puts it: "We'd be hanging out every day no matter what."

Growing up in what many people would simply describe as "the middle of nowhere," Mattheisen and his bandmates didn't have the same path into punk music as most young people do. Without a structured or storied local scene, the three found music on their own terms and created a positive connection to it from the beginning.

In fact, the first thing you realize when you talk to the guys in Tiny Moving Parts is how much joy they derive from being on the road. They've used their music to visit places they never thought they'd be able to go while growing up on the sprawling farmlands of their Minnesota hometown, which houses just 3,000 residents. They've built connections with people all over the country, delivering the same positive attitude they've had toward music all their lives to people who they never thought they'd meet. And, perhaps most impressively, Mattheisen and his cousins are the type of band that appreciates even the nuances of being on the road–navigating their way into a city for the first time, sleeping on living room floors, setting up and breaking down their gear, even the long overnight drives–it's not only worth it to Tiny Moving Parts, it's a part of their essence. The permanent smiles on their faces while they're playing will make you believe that before they even finish their opening song.

The group's positive mindset and close relationship helped them "figure out their sound" over the past couple of years, as Mattheisen says. Their new album, Pleasant Living, out September 9 via Triple Crown Records, showcases a band that has moved past its growing pains and is finding its tride. From the youthful exuberance and frenetic drum work on the opening "Sundress" to the purposefully suppressed yet intense closer "Van Beers," it's apparent from first listen that Tiny Moving Parts knew exactly what they wanted to do with Pleasant Living. And with the help of producer extraordinaire J. Robbins, they were able to get right down to it in a fashion that excels their sophomore status, entering the realm of veteran pomp. Pleasant Living isn't afraid to belt you with its power, it isn't apologetic about being in your face–and neither are the lively personas behind the band.

"I think we've found a happy balance here," Mattheisen says of his band's follow-up to 2013's This Couch Is Long And Full Of Friendship (Kind Of Like Records). "It's mathy, it's complex, it's thought-out, but there's still an element of having fun sing-along songs in there. We really can't wait for people to hear the album." Lead single "Always Focused" defines the dynamic Mattheisen speaks of, with a noodly guitar riff and cries of, "I let myself down when I beat myself up." He says it's a song about worrying: "Even though I overthink everything, I wouldn't have it any other way."

Where This Couch Is Long was a story of a young person trying to discover themselves, Pleasant Living accurately reflects the group's collective unbridled enthusiasm; it's a record about finding a way to remain optimistic in life. It's honest punk rock written by three guys from the Midwest who are experiencing the world together for the first time, and it's a record that Tiny Moving Parts will take to every person who will listen.
Venue Information:
Union Transfer
1026 Spring Garden St.
Philadelphia, PA, 19123